Petroleum distribution terminals serve a vital role in the transportation of energy products in the United States.
STRUCTURAL crews protected various conduits and drains and performed the removal of the existing concrete with a low-impact procedure.
With the need to remain operational 24/7, shutting down or reducing its access to fuel trucks was difficult.
STRUCTURAL crew needed to pay additional attention to the embedded electrical conduits and storm drains that were in close proximity.
Before and after views of the pedestal.
The terminal was able to be returned to full operational status one-day earlier than scheduled.

Petroleum Terminal Pedestal Replacement

Project Highlights 
  • Highly detailed project schedule established to minimize client operational impacts
  • STRUCTURAL Crews operated around the clock to complete repairs on-time
  • Conduits required protection and low-impact concrete removal procedures
Project Description 

Petroleum distribution terminals serve a vital role in the transportation of energy products in the United States. Large bulk fuel trucks utilize distribution terminals around the clock, so maintaining an efficient and safe loading environment is critical.

The owners of a Midwest petroleum terminal noticed that the concrete pedestals supporting the canopy of the structure where trucks receive fuel were showing signs of deterioration and possible loss of structural integrity. Rebar was exposed and concrete delamination was observed.

With the need to remain operational 24/7, shutting down or reducing its access to fuel trucks was difficult. STRUCTURAL, a Structural Group Company, was selected to repair the terminal pedestals while minimizing any impact of regular operations.

STRUCTURAL worked with the Terminal’s operators to develop a turnkey repair solution that mitigated the impact of construction while providing a long-term service life. The approach included a site-specific safety plan, material selection,and engineered lifting and shoring plans to support the canopy during repairs.

Each pedestal presented unique challenges - the operational terminal canopy was a tight work environment and each column was adjacent to other structural, mechanical, electrical and water systems. STRUCTURAL crews protected various conduits and drains and performed the removal of the existing concrete with a low-impact procedure. High early strength cast-in-place concrete was used to replace the pedestals. To minimize impacts on operations, STRUCTURAL crews worked around the clock over a non-peak weekend to safely and efficiently complete the concrete repairs – one day earlier than planned.